Category Archives: Breads

Bagels

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We’re in bagel making heaven here. Yesterday morning I saw this post as soon as I woke up and decided I’d try right away. They are SO easy and SO yummy.

In a bread maker, or kitchen aid or Bosch or whatever, combine:

1 cup warm water (I needed a bit more)
3 cups of bread flour
2 TBS white sugar
1 1/2 tsp. salt
2 1/4 tsp active dry yeast

If you’re using a breadmaker, set it to dough cycle. If you’re not, I’d knead well for about 10 minutes and let the dough rest about 45 minutes.

Then shape the dough into 8-10 balls, flatten, and poke holes. Let them rest for about 30-60 minutes.

First time making bagels. Seems easy, we'll see how they turn out!

Then you’ll boil a pot of water with 3T sugar to be ready when the bagels are done rising. Boil each bagel for 1 minute; 30 seconds on each side. We fit 3 bagels into our pot at a time.

Put the boiled bagels on an ungreased pan that is either sprinkled with 1T cornmeal, or use a silpat (which I did), and bake at 375 for 20 minutes, or until they look just browned enough.

Nathan and I just split a bagel fresh out of the oven and the verdict is in...they are great!! This is so fun! Tomorrow: raisin and cinnamon version. Oh I'm positively giddy.

They’re not beautiful, but they are delicious!

Our first batch of 8 was gone not long after the kids came home from school, so last night I made a second batch of raisin cinnamon. SO YUMMY! I added maybe 3/4 t cinnamon to the dough mixture at the very beginning, along with about 2 handfuls of raisins. It was perfect!

Cinnamon Burst Bread (think Great Harvest)

We LOVE Great Harvest Cinnamon Burst bread, but at more than $6 a loaf, it’s something we only buy a couple times a year.  Doesn’t it make the worlds best french toast?

This recipe came to our rescue about 3 years ago. We love it. It makes enough for four loaves, and it freezes well if it makes it that long.  It usually doesn’t.  We gave 1 1/2 loaves away and finished off the rest in 2 days. Now, here’s the little issue with this recipe: finding the cinnamon bites for it.  Note: do not let this “little issue” stand in your way. Once you find your favorite way to get the cinnamon bites and start making this recipe, you will never stop.

Cinnamon bites and cinnamon chips are totally different. This recipe DOES NOT USE cinnamon chips, that you buy at the grocery store, which are similar to chocolate chips. Cinnamon bites are tiny, hard bullet-like shapes of compacted, slightly sweetened cinnamon. The place I found them in online at one of my favorite baking sources, King Arthur Flour. They’re called cinnamon flav-r-bites and are $7.95 for 16 ounces, which will be enough to make this recipe 2 1/2 times (10 loaves). It’s just that the shipping isn’t cheap.

Option number two is this product from Allison’s Pantry – they’re called Gerken’s Mini Cinnamon Drops.

cinnamon bites for bread

I can’t remember how much they were a bag; my friend Heather and I went in on a bunch of bags and I stocked up.  I do remember ordering was kind of a pain because we had to order through a specific girl, not the store, and it took a long time to receive our order.

cinnamon bites for bread
These are very similar to cinnamon chips, but they are tiny, and they do work really well in the recipe.

Option number three: I had heard since I started making this recipe that Great Harvest gets their cinnamon chips from Honeyville Grain, which has several stores around Salt Lake, and also ships.  Since I have started making this recipe, I haven’t found a Honeyville Grain store that carries the chips anymore, and when I saw a huge Honeyville Grain truck delivering products to our local Great Harvest one morning, I was tempted to get on that truck and do some research. In fact, I SUPER regret not running over to chat with the driver about my little cinnamon chip issue.

If you’re really interested in trying this recipe, especially if you live near me, let’s chat, and perhaps go in on another big order of Allison’s Pantry cinnamon drops.

Are you finally ready for the recipe? This recipe will fill a 6 qt KitchenAid. If you have a smaller mixer, half the recipe. If you have a Bosch, you might be able to double.

3 T. yeast
2/3 cup sugar
4 eggs, beaten lightly
3 3/4 cup warm water
1 1/2 T. salt
3 T. vegetable oil
2 1/2 cups cinnamon bites
10-12 cups flour

Put yeast, sugar and water in the mixer. Let sit for several minutes, until bubbly. Add eggs and 4 cups of flour, and mix until it all combined well. Add salt, oil and cinnamon drops. Mix well. Add 6-7 more cups of flour. Bread flour is best, but you can use all purpose or half fresh ground whole wheat. This will put your mixer through a bit of a work out, and the dough should pull away from the sides of the bowl. You can stop when the batter is still pretty sticky like this:

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as long as it’s still pulling away from the sides of the bowl. This is about 10.5-11 cups of flour. The fastest way to make a bread too tough or dense is to add too much flour. Yep, it’s a bit of a mess to work with, but you’ll really like the finished product so much better. You can add up to 12 cups of flour if you need to, and aren’t in the mood for a bit more mess. But I would never ever do that. Ok? Ok.

Put the dough into a clean large bowl and let rise for 1 hour. Here’s a trick on how to do that, since your dough is so sticky: you will want to spray a work surface with cooking spray, then spray your hands. Scrape the dough out of the bowl and onto the work surface. Then I clean out my mixing bowl, spray it with cooking spray, and after kneading the dough a couple times to get it nice and round, plop it back into the bowl. Cover with a towel.

After the 1 hour rise, the dough will not be sticky at all. Turn it onto a work surface and shape into four loaves. Place in well greased pans, and rise until doubled, about another hour. I usually line my pans with parchment or foil that I spray before putting the loaves in the pans.

Bake at 375 for 30 minutes and immediately turn out of pans to cool.

Julie Jackson’s 1 hour cinnamon rolls

In the cinnamon roll Olympics, I give these silver, and only because I’ve been converted to Tracy M’s sinful cinnamon rolls.  These are really very good and who can beat a 1 hour cinnamon roll, really now?  Julie has made these for several get togethers I’ve been to, sometimes as cinnamon rolls, sometimes as strawberry cream cheese rolls.  They’re all super good.  She uses lecithin (and says it’s insanely sticky if you have the liquid version, so don’t really measure it, just throw in several ‘blobs’) – but I’ve never bought lecithin.  I use regular old vegetable oil. Last note: Bosch lovers can double the recipe.

5 1/4 flour (bread flour, if possible)
1/4 cup sugar
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 1/2 heaping Tbsp instant yeast
2 T oil (or 1 1/2 T lecithin)
2 cups hot water

I throw all the ingredients in my mixer and you’re supposed to mix for about 5 minutes (use the dough hook). Dough will be very sticky.

From Julie J (including her finishing touches): I spray Pam on the counter to roll it out (put some on your hands too, to get it out of the bowl).  Roll it out in a rectangle and spread about 1/3 cup softened butter on the dough.  Put brown sugar everywhere and then sprinkle cinnamon everywhere (I don’t measure those).  Roll it up and cut it apart with dental floss.  Let rise 25 minutes.  Bake at 350 for 15 minutes. (Julie P’s note: I might’ve cut mine bigger…both times they took closer to 23-25 minutes.)  This recipe  makes a jelly roll sized pan (about 16-18 generous sized rolls).

Frosting
1/4 cup softened butter
1/2 tsp vanilla
2 tsp water
2 cups powdered sugar
Cream Cheese filling
4 oz softened cream cheese
1/2 cup powdered sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla
I just put in a spoonful of jam, but I usually make a braid out of the dough and put the cream cheese filling in the middle with pie filling and frosting on top.  Super yum!  I love this bread recipe because it only has to raise once and so I can make bread in about an hour.  I use the dough for pizza, rolls, bread everything

naan

Oh my heavens this is just so good and super easy. I was having a mini heart attack about frying bread, so I used just a small amount of butter for each piece.  We had this tonight with tikka masala.  SO SO GOOD.

Recipe from lizzywrites

Naan
1/2 cup warm water
2 teaspoons active dry yeast
1 teaspoon sugar
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/3 cup plain yogurt
1 large egg
clarified butter, for frying

In a large bowl, stir together the water, yeast and sugar and let stand for 5 minutes, until foamy. Stir in the flour, salt, oil, yogurt and egg and stir. Knead until you have a soft, pliable dough. Cover with a tea towel and let rise until doubled in size; about an hour.
Divide the dough into 6 – 8 pieces and on a lightly floured surface, roll out each piece into a thin circle or oval. Cook each naan in a nice hot skillet drizzled with clarified butter until blistered and cooked, flipping as necessary. When the surface has big blisters and is golden on the bottom, flip it over and cook until golden on the other side. Spread with butter before serving and add chopped garlic and herbs, if desired.

soft pretzels

I saw this Alton Brown recipe for soft pretzels on Cooking with my Kid. We LOVED them.  I really love the pretzels you can buy at the mall – the soft, salty yumminess.  This is probably as close as you can get at home, and as a bonus – they’re super easy. Yeah!!

1 1/2 cups warm water
1 tablespoon sugar
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 package active dry yeast
4 1/2 cups all purpose flour
2 ounces unsalted butter, melted
Vegetable oil
10 cups water
2/3 cup baking soda
1 large egg yolk beaten with 1 tablespoon water
Pretzel salt

Combine the water, sugar and kosher salt in the bowl of a stand mixer and sprinkle the yeast on top. Allow to sit for 5 minutes or until the mixture begins to foam. Add the flour and butter and, using the dough hook attachment, mix on low speed until well combined. Change to medium speed and knead until the dough is smooth and pulls away from the side of the bowl, approximately 4 to 5 minutes. Remove the dough from the bowl, clean the bowl and then oil it well with vegetable oil. Return the dough to the bowl, cover with plastic wrap and sit in a warm place for approximately 50 to 55 minutes or until the dough has doubled in size.

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Line 2 half-sheet pans with parchment paper and lightly brush with the vegetable oil. Set aside.

Bring the 10 cups of water and the baking soda to a rolling boil in an 8-quart saucepan or roasting pan.

In the meantime, turn the dough out onto a slightly oiled work surface and divide into 8 equal pieces. Roll out each piece of dough into a 24-inch rope. Make a U-shape with the rope, holding the ends of the rope, cross them over each other and press onto the bottom of the U in order to form the shape of a pretzel. Place onto the parchment-lined half sheet pan.

Place the pretzels into the boiling water, 1 by 1, for 30 seconds. Remove them from the water using a large flat spatula. Return to the half sheet pan, brush the top of each pretzel with the beaten egg yolk and water mixture and sprinkle with the pretzel salt. Bake until dark golden brown in color, approximately 12 to 14 minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack for at least 5 minutes before serving.

Tastes best when warm.

Pumpkin Cream Cheese Swirl Snack Cake

Another recipe I got from The Family Kitchen. I used their recipe exactly, but baked it in a 9″ square pan – I don’t see how it could fit in even a large bread pan (mine are 9×5)!  We loved it.

Pumpkin Cream Cheese Swirl Bread
1 1/2 cup pumpkin puree
1 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup sugar
3 eggs
1/4 cup milk
5 Tbsp. butter
2 3/4 cups flour
2 tsp. baking powder
2 tablespoons cinnamon

8 oz. cream cheese
1 egg
1/3 cup sugar

In a large bowl, beat together the pumpkin, brown sugar, sugar, 3 eggs, milk, butter, flour, baking powder and cinnamon until well-mixed. In a second bowl, beat together cream chese, egg, and sugar. Generously grease and flour a large bread pan. Spoon a thin layer of the pumpkin batter into the bottom of the bread pan. Make a well in the center of the bread and spoon half the cream cheese filling inside. Cover with another pumpkin batter, then swirl the rest of the cream cheese into that layer before covering all signs of cream cheese  with one last layer of pumpkin batter.  Bake in an oven preheated to 350 degrees for 1 hour, or until a toothpick poked into the center of bread comes out clean.

Pumpkin Pie Cinnamon Rolls

Whoops, I forgot to take a picture.  While they were baking, I was wondering if I should’ve used all AP flour instead of the some AP and some whole wheat that the recipe called for, but they really were great.  If you don’t have access to fresh ground whole wheat flour, I’d probably use all AP flour.  This was a killer easy recipe as far as cinnamon rolls go, and they were pretty great.
1 cup canned pumpkin
2 large eggs
2 T to 1/4 cup (or a bit more) water, lukewarm
1/4 cup butter, softened
2 1/2 cups all purpose flour
1 3/4 c whole wheat flour
1/4 c dry milk
1 t ground cinnamon
1/2 t groung ginger
1/4 t ground cloves
3 T brown sugar
1 1/2 t salt
2 t instant yeast
Mix everything to combine well.  Dough might be pretty sticky and that’s fine.  It just needs to hold its shape.
For the water, I used 1/4 cup PLUS 2 T. We’re in a really dry area. If you’re in a more humid place, you’ll use less.  Start with less and add slowly.
Place dough in lightly greased bowl and let rise 90 minutes.  It won’t rise much, and will NOT double. It might look puffy.
Roll into rectangle that is 14″x22″.  The dough will be really thin.
Combine 1 cup sugar and 1 1/2 – 2T cinnamon.  Wet the dough with a bit of milk and sprinkle on the cinnamon sugar.
Starting at one short end, roll the dough tightly into a log.  Seal closed.  Original directions said cut into 9 rolls, I did 12 and they were decent sized.
Place rolls in a greased pan (my 12 rolls fit perfectly into a 9×13 pan, directions say to use a 9″ square for the 9).
Let rise for 1 hour. Will be a bit puffy.  Bake for 25-30 minutes at 375.  Cool about 15 minutes.  Frost with cream cheese frosting.